Instead

28– Leftovers, from a few of your favorite researchers

July 27, 2020 Utah State University Office of Research Episode 28
Instead
28– Leftovers, from a few of your favorite researchers
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Instead
28– Leftovers, from a few of your favorite researchers
Jul 27, 2020 Episode 28
Utah State University Office of Research

Wyatt plays some of the best clips that didn't make the cut from past episodes. This episode features a little bit of everything.

Dr. Tammy Proctor tells us about the birth of the Girl Scouts, and their role in WWI. Listen to her full episode here

Dr. Patrick Singleton explains how we can all hate bikes a little less. Listen to his full episode surrounding commuting during COVID-19 here

Dr. Breanne Litts gives her opinion on the best practices for the online classroom. Listen to her full episode about the future of virtual learning here

Dr. Todd Johnson illustrates his vision for the future of the Intermountain West. Listen to his full episode where he lays out his plan to redefine Pocatello here

Dr. Courtney Flint explains why the Intermountain West is so special. Listen to the episode that started it all here

Show Notes Transcript

Wyatt plays some of the best clips that didn't make the cut from past episodes. This episode features a little bit of everything.

Dr. Tammy Proctor tells us about the birth of the Girl Scouts, and their role in WWI. Listen to her full episode here

Dr. Patrick Singleton explains how we can all hate bikes a little less. Listen to his full episode surrounding commuting during COVID-19 here

Dr. Breanne Litts gives her opinion on the best practices for the online classroom. Listen to her full episode about the future of virtual learning here

Dr. Todd Johnson illustrates his vision for the future of the Intermountain West. Listen to his full episode where he lays out his plan to redefine Pocatello here

Dr. Courtney Flint explains why the Intermountain West is so special. Listen to the episode that started it all here

Wyatt: [00:00:00] Hello and welcome to the 28th episode of instead. Sometimes my interviews are only an hour and other times they're like three hours. So today you're going to hear the best bits that I had to save for later because we just couldn't fit I'm in the final episode, my name is Wyatt Tropper. And you could be rummaging around the deep freeze looking for a lost Popsicle, but you are listening to this instead.

I'm excited to get to share some of these leftovers with you. And one of the pieces I'm most excited about is from episode eight. When I talked to historian Tammy Proctor in episode eight, we talk about the pandemic of 1918, as well as world war one's, female intelligence. Agents and they used girl guides.

They're British version of girl Scouts has interoffice curriers. Here's the juicy tidbit of how they got started. So you mentioned that the British government employed girl guides during world, world war one. What were they doing? What was the mission of the girl? They 

Tammy Proctor: [00:01:10] had a girl guide troop that was actually attached to  headquarters and their job.

Basically was to carry messages. They started with boy Scouts, but decided they were too troublesome. And so they, they switched them out for the girls. 

Wyatt: [00:01:25] How common was it for a girl to be in the girl 

Tammy Proctor: [00:01:27] guide? God started as an offshoot of the boy Scouts. And just, you know, if, if you don't already know this, the boy Scouts started in great Britain.

They didn't start in the United States. And, um, they, uh, initially did not. Um, specifically bar girls. I mean, it was a boys organization, but girls, um, joined by changing their names to initials and getting a hold of, um, guidebooks and badges. And when the boy scout leaders, um, found out that there were girls joining in this way, They decided it might be good to start a girls organization.

So the girls, um, had their own organization as of 1909. So about two years after the boys and, um, their numbers went up pretty substantially during the war. It was across class movement, but. More by the 1920s. A lot of middle-class girls, of course, but some working class girls as well. 

Wyatt: [00:02:24] So when war time started to pick up and they found the boys too troublesome, do you know anything about the process of switching to girl guides and the responses going around?

Um, the change. 

Tammy Proctor: [00:02:39] So am I five actually wasn't am I five until 1916? Um, and Britain didn't have an, a permanent intelligence Bureau when the war broke out, they had, they had started, um, An intelligence service prior to the war, but just barely prior to the war, just, you know, a couple of years. So a lot of the decisions were kind of ad hoc at the beginning.

Um, there were women who were working for, um, the intelligence Bureau as early. As it's founding as clerks and, um, typists. And when war broke out, they hired a lot of other women to work. Um, in the, especially in the information tracking intelligence concerns in Britain and, uh, cross-referencing them and writing reports and doing all of that.

So it wasn't entirely surprising that they might turn to girl messengers since they had women already working in the, uh, In the Bureau.

Wyatt: [00:03:38] I just loved the girls were joining the boy Scouts because they didn't have their own organization yet. And don't, you want to see a movie made about all those office politics?

Okay. So let's jump to episode 12 where I interviewed Patrick Singleton. He's a transportation engineer and he studies how people get from point a to point B years ago, I was driving with a friend and we got cut off by a bicycle. Whoever's on this bike was not following the rules of the road. And after it happened, my friend said, I hate cars when I'm walking.

I hate pedestrians when I'm driving, but I always hate bikes. So I asked Patrick what could be done to hate bikes, less. His response was great. And as you're about to hear it applies to more than just intermodal traffic. That's a great question. 

Patrick Singleton: [00:04:26] Um, so I did my PhD at Portland state university and, and. I was a bike commuter there and I would get angry at other people bicycling too.

And I'm sure people got angry at me. Um, I think, I think we just sorta have to realize that we're all sort of in this together. We're all, we're all trying to get to the same place, um, safely and conveniently and have a little bit of fun and enjoyment doing it. And, you know, as much as we can sort of. Try different modes and sort of get a feel for, Oh, that, that person on the bike, isn't just in the center of lane because they feel like they're arrogant and can belong there.

It's because, Oh, there's a pothole and debris in the right side of the lane. That's where they can't be riding there. So I think if we all sort of try to get a little more empathy about how other people try 

Wyatt: [00:05:16] to get around, I love that because I think a dash of empathy can help in a lot of situations.

Which brings us to episode 14. In episode 14, I talked to Dr. Brianne Litz. She researches educational experiences and instructional design. We talked a lot about how she runs her online courses and what things people making online courses should keep in mind. Brianne was so wonderful. And I talked to her for like three hours, so a lot got cut, but I'm happy I get to share this he's with you now.

Yeah. You said that posting a video helps to humanize you. Why is. Humanizing yourself an important thing to do if you're a teacher? Um, 


Breanne Litts: [00:06:02] important to have a relationship with your students. We are kind of cultural beings and we all are really unique. And I think, um, I just. Utterly despise the way in which most online interaction dehumanizes us.

And it just like usually breaks my heart to look at any comment section. Uh, and, and I think like humanity is actually a lot better than that. And so,  um, I think it helps. 

Breanne Litts: [00:06:28] Resolve a lot of those things, cause I can be who I am. People can see tone, they can see sort of facial expressions. Um, and I mean, there's also like research that talks about the presence of an instructor in a course has a huge indicator or has a huge impact on a student's performance in that course.

And so I think giving presence as much as I'm 

Wyatt: [00:06:50] able to, if you'd like to hear more from Dr. Litz, check out episode 14. In the next episode, episode 15, I tell the story of use landscape architecture and environmental planning department, where teachers and students help cities have a vision of how they can guide the growth of their community.

The city we profile in episode 15 is Pocatello. Idaho Pocatello has a really fascinating story. In episode 15, you'll hear from a student Jim Anglesey and his teacher, Todd Johnson. Talk about their work. Todd Johnson has been in the landscape architecture and urban planning realm. For decades. And for some reason I forgot to include this clip.

Essentially. It's a genius, his vision of the Intermountain West's future, 

Todd Johson: [00:07:40] the takeaways from Pocatello that are applicable. Uh, there's a really compelling idea that's brewing in my mind. And that is that. In the same way that people are not aware of Pocatello's assets and that awareness needs to be raised by showing them plans, having conversations, showing them drone flights, getting them to be aware of how beautiful a place it is.

A similar lack of awareness exists. The amazing things that are in what I would call an inner mountain empire and that inner mountain empire spans from. The grand Canyon to Yellowstone park. It has significant, um, urban ization quarters, the Wasatch front. It has St. George. It has a collection of communities now in, in, uh, the eight or 10 national parks and monuments that exist around.

The grand Canyon, Yellowstone of universities of significance, major and distinct world religion, ski resorts that are unparalleled. That collection of things in this, uh, inner mountain empire, I think is the awareness that needs to be brought in the same way that an awareness of what the assets that are precious and need to be, you know, better nurtured in any one of the communities within that.

So if we create. And reaffirm communities in their values inside this extended inner mountain empire. And we get them sharing information and seeing themselves as an interconnected operative hole. 

Wyatt: [00:09:22] I think that's huge. I like to imagine passenger rail. Running from Yellowstone through Pocatello, clear to Phoenix.

I could just hop on the train for a family weekend in St. George. I'd look out the window and see a semi entering the passing lane. Patiently overtaking the old pickup truck, pulling a camper uphill. Sorry. I was just daydreaming. Do you want to hear more from Todd Johnson? Check out episode 15. If you want to hear.

How life is special here in the Intermountain West. Listen to episode two with sociologist Dr. Courtney Flint. It was my first interview for instead, and it was my second day living in a pandemic. Here's a clip from episode two, you're from Montana, right? 

Courtney Flint: [00:10:03] I am Montana and I also grew up. 

Wyatt: [00:10:04] So I'm in Arizona.

I think that a lot of the times the inner mountain West gets forgotten about in popular media and TV shows. What are some of the defining characteristics of. The Intermountain West, I think there's 

Courtney Flint: [00:10:15] sort of a looking back sort of at a historical view of the Intermountain West. It's this kind of wild frontier, it's this open spaces and, um, writers and other people thinking about the West have defined this space in terms of aridity.

And, and also the topography right, that we have is so unique and, and we have great distances between us and this vastness of the region and that. Lends itself to this independence, this rugged individualist kind of freedom seeking identity. But I think that the Intermountain West today is. Really dynamic.

It's no longer a crossroads or I fly over space. It's a destination, not just for tourists, um, seeking to see the national parks or, you know, coming to ski or something like that. But it's a destination for families and for careers and people, um, making, you know, a new there's so much entrepreneurship in the West these days, and there's a vibrant kind of economic.

Um, uh, environment that I think is setting the Intermountain West apart, you know, the, the dynamic growth and in terms of population growth and economic growth, uh, creates an excitement in the inner mountain West that I don't think is part of the historical sort of framing of the 

Wyatt: [00:11:38] West. What is. Driving this dynamism here in the West.

Courtney Flint: [00:11:44] I mean, I, in some ways I think it comes back to space. We have space and I don't just mean physical space, but we have that we've had spaces to grow. Our cities throughout the West have had room to sort of sprawl out a little bit. We're meeting some of those limits in the Wasatch front here, but, um, and the people who have come to settle here for whatever reason, found space to.

Grow ideas as well. This kind of Western can-do spirit, we're used to looking after ourselves and looking after each other in a time of, so we've got this rugged individualist, independent spirit, I think, especially in the Western us and the rural spaces. Um, but boy, do we care for each other when times get tough?

Wyatt: [00:12:30] If you'd like to hear more from Courtney, go and listen to episode two. Thank you for listening to these instead leftovers. I think it's a nice sampling of what this podcast has to offer. Okay. So think of one of your favorite color eggs. Ooh, you picked a good one. Now send them a link to this episode.

Thanks for thinking about me. It's a nice feeling. And I bet the person you've shared this episode with is also happy to be thought of. So remember that a dash of empathy can help attend situation, do what you can to bring humanity into digital spaces. And don't forget to take care of others. This episode of instead was produced and edited by Nick Vasquez and me Wyatt  as part of our work.

And the office of research at Utah state university.